Archive for January, 2013

Getting at real transformation: advice for aspiring change leaders

I recently asked a group of smart, experienced people what advice they would give others about managing change in an organizational context. The first response (after a short period of silence): “It takes time, and grit.” While subsequent suggestions may have been a bit more specific, the honesty and accuracy of that first response stole the show. It does take time, and leading change—particularly large-scale change—is not for the faint of heart.

How do you describe a change leader?

Emotional intelligence certainly helps. Change leaders must recognize, acknowledge and address both personal and organizational feelings of loss, uncertainty about the future and fear of the unknown. They must be willing to invest time, energy and resources in helping the organization move through the process and in managing resistance along the way. Change leaders must engage other change leaders, continuously building and supporting a team of individuals to champion and guide the change process. And they must emphasize communication. Great change leaders are optimistic and consistent in delivering a message of moving forward. They communicate regularly, talking with people face-to-face as well as virtually. They continually check the pulse of the organization.

John Kotter’s eight stages to transform

One of the most challenging aspects of leading change is ensuring that all stakeholders—clients, customers, managers, line staff, volunteers, board members, even funders—grasp the need for change. In times of stress (and who isn’t experiencing stress these days?), maintaining the status quo is tempting, as is “nibbling at the edges” by opting for small,less-painful adjustments over true transformation.

John Kotter speaks eloquently to this in his 2007 Harvard Business Review article “Leading Change: Why Transformation Efforts Fail,” in which he outlines eight stages that must be managed in order to give your transformation effort the best chance of succeeding:

1. Establish a sense of urgency.
2. Form a powerful guiding coalition to lead the effort.
3. Create a vision to direct the change initiative.
4. Communicate the vision, using every vehicle possible.
5. Empower others to act on the vision, e.g., by encouraging risk taking.
6. Create short-term wins.
7. Consolidate performance improvements and produce more change.
8. Institutionalize new approaches developed during the initiative.

The danger of quick fixes

Over the years I have seen many organizations struggle to institute some kind of major organizational change, recognizing only later they had stumbled at Step 1: establishing a sense of urgency. Sometimes the impetus for change comes from the board and staff never fully buy into the need. Other times it is a charismatic ED, someone who knows the organization needs to change and sees a clear path forward, but doesn’t fully appreciate the doubt that still exists among line staff. Even those who see and acknowledge a need for change may not feel a sense of urgency. That is often when a range of “quick fix” suggestions are made.

Our clients don’t feel heard; let’s set up a Facebook page and encourage dialogue through social media. Turnover has been high; we need to re-evaluate our hiring process and make sure we are attracting the type of candidate who would succeed here. Our competitors are expanding the range of services they offer; perhaps we, too, need to consider offering a more comprehensive range of services. These may or may not be good ideas, depending on the situation, but chances are these actions in isolation will not solve the larger problem, or get the organization to where it really wants (and needs) to be.

Questions to start the change conversation sense of urgency? The following questions can help jumpstart the conversation.

What is happening internally that might indicate a need for change? What is happening externally?
What is (or will be) the impact on mission attainment, service quality, client/customer satisfaction, financial sustainability, and morale among staff and board members if these things continue?
How have others in the field addressed similar challenges and/or opportunities? Did they seek change? Why or why not? What was the result?
What could happen if we change?
What will happen if we don’t change?

That last question may be the most important. Sometimes it is the acknowledgement that the status quo will not, in fact, best serve the organization and its mission that is the most powerful driver. Change is hard, but in the long run, not changing might be a whole lot harder.

See also:

A Sense of Urgency

Switch: How to Change Things When Change is Hard.

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Charity Case: Are nonprofits operating under a separate rule book?

Charity Case author Dan Pallotta explains the number of nonprofit organizations that have crossed the $50 million annual revenue barrier since 1970 is 144. He adds, the number of for-profits that have crossed it is 46,136, and as many as 80 percent of nonprofit organizations in the U.S. have budgets under $500,000. Finally, only one percent have budgets greater than $1 million.

Despite the fact that our sector is tackling issues of “massive proportions,” we are required to work under a separate rule book, one that doesn’t have any of the proven capital strategies our corporate sector leverages every day.

“This is the crux of the matter,” says Pallotta.

Pallotta explains this discriminatory rule book reflects five transgressions against our sector:

1) Compensation: We let the for-profit sector pay people a competitive wage based on the value they produce without limit. Want to make $50 million selling video games to children? Have at it, says Pallotta. “But if you want to pay the right leader half a million dollars to cure kids of malaria, you and the leaders are parasites yourselves.”

2) Advertising and marketing: Charities can’t build demand for donations to their causes while businesses advertise until the last dollar no longer produces a penny of value.

3) Risk taking in pursuit of new donors: While it’s okay if the movie industry spends $100 million on flops, a $5 million charity walk that doesn’t show a 75 percent profit in the first year is considered suspect. Consequently, nonprofits shy away from large-scale fundraising ideas and cannot benefit from powerful learning curves.

4) Time horizon: New companies can go six years without returning any profits to investors in the interest of building market dominance while charities that have long-term goals are expected to yield short-term, direct services. If they don’t deliver, they are pariahs.

5) Profit: Businesses can offer profits to cultivate investment capital, but there’s no such vehicle for charities. The social sector is starved for growth capital.

The author included a relevant quote from former president of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Paulette Maehara. She says we are to blame for perpetuating some of these transgressions. “The sector has fallen into a trap we created. By focusing on what we DON’T spend, and not on what has been accomplished, we have completely missed the mark in our messaging. We are part of this problem and it’s up to us to educate our way out of it,” adds Maehara.

Pick up a copy of Dan Pallotta’s Charity Case. It’s a provocative look at some of the sector’s most persistent problems as well as Pallotta’s comprehensive answer to them.

Do you have personal experience with one of the transgressions mentioned above?

See also:

Page to Practice™ book summary of Charity Case
Page to Practice™ book summary of One-Hour Activist

Image credit: TED, danpallotta.com

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Build nonprofit momentum through better business (Audio)

Join us for our first installment of an interview with Deirdre Maloney, author of “The Mission Myth,” here.

In the interview, Maloney discusses her comprehensive book about “building nonprofit momentum through better business.” Maloney is now the founder and president of Momentum, a consulting firm, after serving a seven-year term as Executive Director of the Colorado AIDS Project. This book compiles advice from her experience as an executive director. She covers the most important aspects of running a nonprofit organization through her four M’s (management, money, marketing and measurement) while supplying tips and pitfalls for the seasoned executive. She stresses the importance of building systems to run organizations effectively because if these systems are neglected while passionately following the mission, then we cannot “do good well.” Maloney tries to support this tough leadership position and is honest about how she learns from her mistakes. “Mild audacity” describes her style. Listen to Deirdre Maloney’s own words in her first installment and see more on “The Mission Myth.”

See also:

Nonprofit Sustainability: Making Strategic Decisions for Financial Viability

A Fundraising Guide for Nonprofit Board Members

The Nonprofit Marketing Guide

 

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Why do half of all chief fundraisers want to quit?

Join me in taking a closer look at our latest feature at CausePlanet: Charity Case by Dan Pallotta. In Pallotta’s prior book, Uncharitable, he presents the problem with our social sector: the way our society has been taught to think about charity is backwards. Furthermore, the social sector is required to work with a different rule book than the corporate world, which prevents us from moving the needle on humanitarian issues. Uncharitable prompts readers to ask what we should do about it.

Charity Case is a comprehensive answer. It’s a blueprint for a national movement that will put our society on the right track to support social issues. Pallotta argues the social sector needs its own civil rights movement and explains his plan for a new “Charity Defense Council” to lead it. The Council should approach the problem from five angles: 1) Establish an Anti-Defamation League; 2) launch an aggressive, paid public media campaign; 3) enact a National Civil Rights Act for Charity and Social Enterprise; 4) establish a Legal Defense Fund; and 5) organize the sector on behalf of its own issues (including 17 ways to get involved in this movement).

We asked Pallotta about the foundation community’s role in his movement. His answer references an interesting article in the Chronicle of Philanthropy this week:

CausePlanet: The foundation community seems to be uniquely poised for funding and supporting some of the five strategies you’ve explored—especially because one of the problems is rooted in the misguided goal of maintaining a low overhead. What are your thoughts on this statement?

Pallotta: Foundations are notoriously risk-adverse, and they have a high rate of illiteracy about the power of fundraising. In fact, there is a story in the “Chronicle of Philanthropy” this week that says half of all chief fundraisers would like to quit their jobs, primarily because even their own CEOs don’t understand fundraising. Foundations understand it even less. I think the capital that foundations are sitting on would be well-used to fund an effort like this, but it’s going to take an enormous amount of work to get them to see the light.

Watch for more interview highlights with Pallotta in the upcoming weeks and follow him at www.charitycasebook.com and  www.charitydefensecouncil.org for more discussion about these issues.

See also:

Page to Practice summary of Charity Case

Page to Practice summary of One-Hour Activist

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Consider priorities and project type before enlisting pro bono

“I always have an intuitive sense of what my organization needs—but by unpacking my reasons, I’m better able to set priorities and determine what can be done pro bono, and what I need to pay for,” says Ellen Schneider, executive director with Active Voice.

 

Schneider is an active user of pro bono work and highlighted in Aaron Hurst’s book, “Powered by Pro Bono.” Stepping back and prioritizing what projects are suited for pro bono work is an important preliminary step. That’s why when we reviewed Hurst’s book, we asked him about what projects are especially a good fit. Here’s what Hurst had to say:

 

CausePlanet: One of your profiled executive directors is quoted for finding success with focusing his pro bono professionals on tactical versus strategic projects. Is this a common strategy or simply consistent with behavior along your beginner-to-expert continuum?

 

Hurst: As with any consulting work, the less providers need to know about the sector or your organization, the easier it will be for them to create a deliverable that’s useful to you. This all comes down to the scope of work–the more tactical projects simply require less background–which is not to say that strategic projects can’t be successful, but it’s a good starting point.

 

CausePlanet: Is there an ideal type of project with which to experiment, using your four steps for pro bono engagement?

 

Hurst: Something simple is always best. To really see the value though, I would recommend a project with a rewarding and visual result, like a brochure or an annual report. Each is typically straightforward, and nonprofits capitalize on both the added bandwidth from the pro bono consultants as well as their design competencies, giving them a tangible result to show off after the fact.

 

CausePlanet members: Join us for a live conversation with author Aaron Hurst on Thursday, January 31 and get your pro bono questions answered.

 

By Denise McMahan

 

See also:

 

Leveraging Good Will by Alice Korngold

Powered by Pro Bono by Aaron Hurst

Stretch your marketing dollars by Mark Howard

Other blogs about pro bono services

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Look at priorities and project types before enlisting donated services

“I always have an intuitive sense of what my organization needs—but by unpacking my reasons, I’m better able to set priorities and determine what can be done pro bono, and what I need to pay for,” says Ellen Schneider, executive director with Active Voice.

Schneider is an active user of pro bono work and highlighted in Aaron Hurst’s book, “Powered by Pro Bono.” Stepping back and prioritizing what projects are suited for pro bono work is an important preliminary step. That’s why when we reviewed Hurst’s book, we asked him about what projects are especially a good fit. Here’s what Hurst had to say:

CausePlanet: One of your profiled executive directors is quoted for finding success with focusing his pro bono professionals on tactical versus strategic projects. Is this a common strategy or simply consistent with behavior along your beginner-to-expert continuum?

Hurst: As with any consulting work, the less providers need to know about the sector or your organization, the easier it will be for them to create a deliverable that’s useful to you. This all comes down to the scope of work–the more tactical projects simply require less background–which is not to say that strategic projects can’t be successful, but it’s a good starting point.

CausePlanet: Is there an ideal type of project with which to experiment, using your four steps for pro bono engagement?

Hurst: Something simple is always best. To really see the value though, I would recommend a project with a rewarding and visual result, like a brochure or an annual report. Each is typically straightforward, and nonprofits capitalize on both the added bandwidth from the pro bono consultants as well as their design competencies, giving them a tangible result to show off after the fact.

CausePlanet members: Join us for a live conversation with author and founder of Taproot Foundation, Aaron Hurst, on Thursday, January 31 and get your pro bono questions answered.

See also:

Leveraging Good Will

Powered by Pro Bono

Stretch your marketing dollars

Leave a reply

Seven ways to maximize your conference outcomes

Planning ahead, dividing the workload and sharing knowledge gained from attending a conference can maximize your results.

Over the last few years, I have attended some excellent conferences on fundraising and nonprofit development: Grantmakers Without Borders, Civicus World Assembly, Association of Fundraising Professionals, Women’s Funding Network and the Colorado Nonprofit Association, to name a few. I always come away feeling inspired but a little overwhelmed by the whirlwind of information and contacts I have collected. Sometimes I attend conferences to gain new skills and specific information to share with clients, and other times I attend to connect with my colleagues and meet new people. The benefits come from the real-time interactions, spontaneous meetings with people I may have only communicated with online, and the ability to share ideas immediately through various networks. For some of us, this amazing inflow of information compacted into a few days can be hard to process; fortunately, there are some creative ways to help us manage what we learn.

Seven tips

Below are seven strategies that conference attendees can use to effectively compile new information and maximize motivation:

1. Plan ahead and learn about the experts you’ll have the chance to hear from.
2. Don’t set limits on what you can do. You attend conferences to gain exposure to new concepts and new ways of doing things, so choose sessions that will introduce you to new ideas rather than those where you might feel the most comfortable.
3. Write a daily summary of what you learn.
4. Share all your thoughts and experiences with your colleagues. Pass ideas on to staff and board members and do not worry about how rough they seem. The content and conversations around them can inspire change.
5. If you’re attending the event with a team, “divide and conquer” the conference with colleagues for the most benefit to your organization.
6. Talk to people at the sessions you attend to create a network of new colleagues, and make notes on the back of the cards you collect right away.
7. Change something. Attending a conference will affect change because it gets you out of the office and away from the regular routine. While most think our work environments are dynamic and rapidly changing places, people fall into ruts. Use what you learn to change up your routine.

After the conference

The most important point to remember is if you don’t ask yourself what you’ve learned and organize your new ideas right away, your ability to inspire and influence your team will be lost. Instead, take a moment to ask yourself the questions below at the end of each day and draft your follow-up plan. Going to conferences shows your passion and interest in the field. Let people know you went. You will be surprised at how many people are interested and want to know more. Finally, information management is personal, and there is plenty of room for creativity. Just commit to doing something that channels your inspiration into action.

Questions to ask yourself

1) What was the most important and useful thing you learned today?
2) What old routine did you think of today that you want to get out of? If you can implement one positive change as a result of what you learned in a conference, you’ve succeeded in helping your organization prosper.
3) Whom did you meet today that you would like to follow up with and potentially collaborate with in the future?
4) What’s your plan to communicate what you learned today with your team, constituents or board members?

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Strategy is a 24/7 endeavor

As nonprofits began adopting successful practices from the business community, they grabbed hold of one with an iron grip:  strategic planning.  However, in our efforts to embrace the practice, we confused the process of planning with the real work of setting and implementing a strategy.  The planning process became the proverbial junk drawer.  We tossed the odds and ends into the drawer with the expectation that a single process could address them all – the disconnected board that wouldn’t raise money, the staff in need of team building and the need for relevance in a changing market.

The hidden cost?  We’ve become accustomed to thinking strategically only on an episodic basis – when it’s time for the annual board retreat or when our strategic plan has “come due.” It was simply too time consuming to update the plan document.  So we let it gather dust on the shelf or sit idly in the drawer as we went about the real work of running our nonprofits every day. It’s time to take that dusty or irrelevant plan off the self – and throw it away.

We’ve muddled the essence of strategy with the process of plan development.  They are not the same.  To make matters worse, we’ve allowed multi-faceted organizational issues to distract our strategic focus.  The result?  A drawn-out process that causes us to live in suspended reality.  When the process is over, we find ourselves digging deep for the energy to implement.

We could get by with that “process in lieu of strategy” approach when the external environment was more settled.  Gosh, looking back the 1990s and early 2000s seem almost idyllically stable, don’t they?

You simply cannot afford to confuse planning with strategy in today’s dynamically complex world. It’s time to create the game plan – the play book – the “use it every day ‘til it’s dog-eared” handbook.  The strategic direction that truly guides your monthly and quarterly endeavors – the one you “truth test” against.  The resource so valuable that you’ve uploaded it to your tablet and smart phone.

We’re talking about an organizational strategy.  Not tactics.  Strategy can be defined as a coordinated series of actions.  The operative words are coordinated and series.

Now is the time to adapt.  Today’s nonprofit leaders need to find the true connections between the external environment and your organization’s real competencies and vulnerabilities.  As you craft your strategy real-time you’ll need to consider your organization’s unique position in the marketplace.

One of the best resources we’ve found in the strategy setting arena is the article “Can You Say What Your Strategy Is?” by David J. Collis and Michael G. Rukstad from the Harvard Business Review (April 2008).  This seminal piece presents three key concepts:

A hierarchy of statements that illustrates the relationship between mission, vision, values and strategy.  Board members will thank you as you give them something easy to understand.  Strategy wonks will love it as a tool.

A visual of the strategic sweet spot – the market and customers your organization serves best in consideration of what others provide.

A strategy statement that clearly and succinctly describes who you will serve, how you will serve them, and the comparative advantage you will embrace.

The exercise of writing a strategy statement – and we at Corona Insights have written numerous with our clients – is harder than you’d think.  Organizations tend to think they have clarity only to find a lack of agreement and buy-in. The problem?  Our strategy isn’t precise and simple enough to remember.  Imagine if the folks at Apple designed your strategy.  Ah yes.  A strategy statement so clear and concise that you’ve memorized it – and so has your team.

You’ll find the hierarchy of statements is really helpful when articulating your strategy as you ask yourselves, “Is our strategy distinct from our mission?  Might we have confused our vision with our strategy?”

Now that you’ve defined and committed your strategy to memory, it’s time to use it – 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, all year long.  This means you’ll be testing against it and adapting it as required.  Imagine an executive staff or board discussion that goes like this.

We said we were going to pursue ____ strategy.

Does Opportunity A really fit our strategy?  Does it augment or strengthen our business model?  If it doesn’t we shouldn’t pursue it.  If it does – or could with a tweak – then we should.

Are we forecasting changes in the external environment that portend vulnerabilities to our business model?  Revenue sources that were certain two years ago aren’t even likely today.  Eek they’re risky.

Have conditions changed substantially enough to warrant a reality check of our strategy?

As you anticipate the New Year, I encourage you to make the following resolutions.

We’re going to have a strategy – and it’s going to be clear enough that I can articulate it regularly and ensure my team (board and staff) get it too.

I’m going to use a strategy play book – and I’m going to update it as needed to take advantage of opportunities and address threats real-time.  Our whole team is going to be operating from the same play book.

I’m going to anticipate a continually high level of uncertainty in the external environment and will act accordingly – that means we’ll reality-check our strategy on a regular basis.

Best of all, your board will l-o-v-e you when you tell them they don’t need to participate in another day-long retreat or months-long process that leaves them thinking “what’s this all about anyway?”  Like you, they’ll see that strategy is a 24/7 endeavor.

See also:

Nonprofit Sustainability

The Nonprofit Business Plan

The Nonprofit Strategy Revolution

Image credit: worldsoccertalk.com

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Supplement fundraising by exchanging value

It’s no coincidence our sector is looking at redefining its business models when 88% of nonprofits in 2012 were faced with increases in the demand for their services despite 57% barely having enough cash on hand to last them three months. (1)

In “Pride & Prejudice: (What) Can Nonprofits Learn From the For-Profit World?” by Richard Dare last May in the Huffington Post, I was intrigued by his challenge to fellow nonprofits to reexamine their business models and consider several ideas he’s observed and read about over the years:

1) side-ventures to supplement traditional fundraising (gift shops, space rental, cafeterias),
2) innovative partnerships that exchange value (see www.MissionMeasurement.com by Jason Saul),
3) new money from your core operations (create a model that serves other party’s interests beyond your own).

Don’t wait to consider new options. Increased demand for services and the diminishing ability to maintain three months of cash reserves is a chronic scenario we diagnose when we’re in the field working with Execute Now! clients. Financial strain in the midst of high service demand has no bias—both large and small, as well as seasoned and start-up nonprofits, struggle with this challenge. We also see increasing competition for individual donors and grantmakers within the sector and within specific causes. “There are over 1.4 million nonprofits in the U.S., more than 500,000 of which have been created in the last ten years! Yet according to the Urban Institute, there are only 1,100 different ‘types’ of nonprofit programs. Simple math tells us that, on average, there are over one thousand nonprofits for each type of problem,” states Jason Saul in The End of Fundraising.

Diversify your revenue stream. All three of Richard Dare’s suggestions have a common theme that involves depending less on donated income and more on the exchange of value, either directly with your constituency or with peers who share an interest in your constituency. We spend a fair amount of time helping our clients forecast cash flow so they can accommodate lengthy grant cycles and cultivate large donors. Imagine how those projections might be boosted by alternative revenue arrangements.

Look at fulfilling your mission in new ways. Above all, our most successful clients are those who look for new ways to implement their mission in every strategy they explore. Each new venture enhances their business model and is scrutinized for relevancy and financial sustainability. Additionally, these nonprofit leaders constantly look at the value they provide not only to their clients, but also to their stakeholders. Who are your stakeholders? Jason Saul says they have a vested interest in the social outcomes you produce. Look at your nonprofit community and reexamine who your stakeholders might be.

Learn more about our nonprofit services or download an assessment form to determine your nonprofit’s financial assistance needs.

1: Nonprofit Finance Fund 2012 Survey Results

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Kick your fundraising plan to the curb

As any nonprofit leader will tell you, fundraising is not getting any easier. As we continue to slug along in a difficult economic environment, I’d like to outline a new vision for how the nonprofit sector receives funding.

Fundraising in its current form just doesn’t work anymore. Indeed, traditional fundraising is holding the sector back by keeping nonprofits in the starvation cycle of trying to do more and more with less and less.

Really, what nonprofits need is a financing strategy, not a fundraising strategy. By that I mean nonprofits have to break out of the narrow view that traditional FUNDRAISING (individual donor appeals, events, foundation grants) will completely fund all their activities. Instead, nonprofits must work to create a broader approach to securing the overall FINANCING necessary to create social change.

What does this new approach to financing a nonprofit look like?

  1. Nonprofits understand funding programs and general operating expenses is not enough to survive and thrive. All activities that bring money in the door (individual donors, foundation grants, earned income, government contracts, loans, etc.) are integrated and part of a larger financing strategy that supports the short AND long term goals, as well as the programs AND infrastructure of the organization.
  2. Nonprofits no longer segregate fundraising from their other activities (programming, administration). All elements of a nonprofit’s operations, including the money-making ones, are fully integrated and moving forward together.
  3. Individuals, who make up 80%+ of the private money entering the sector, become a greater focus of fundraising efforts, rather than corporate or foundation philanthropy, which make up 5% and 12%, respectively, of the private money entering the sector.
  4. Fundraising messaging moves from an emphasis on the tin-cup mentality and donor benefit to an emphasis on the social impact a nonprofit is creating.
  5. Money is raised to support not only the direct services a nonprofit provides, but also the infrastructure (staff, technology, systems, evaluation, training) of the organization. Nonprofits understand they will only get better at delivering impact if they have an effective organization behind their work.
  6. Other types of capital vehicles, like loans and equity, are added to a nonprofit’s financing mix.
  7. Earned-income opportunities are evaluated and if appropriate, launched. Earned income is not right for every nonprofit, but it is worth exploring and analyzing opportunities as they come and understanding and embracing the revenue-generation possibilities.
  8. The net revenue of every money-making activity a nonprofit engages in (events, individual fundraising appeals, corporate sponsorships, earned income, etc.) is calculated and evaluated. Low net revenue activities are replaced with higher net endeavors.
  9. Nonprofits move away from “push” fundraising and marketing efforts that force their message on innocent bystanders (e.g., direct mail appeals) and toward “pull” fundraising and marketing efforts that bring interested donors/prospects to the organization (e.g., blogs, Twitter, Facebook, friend-raising events, etc.).

There really is a better way. Nonprofits don’t have to wear out their fundraisers, their donors, their staff and their message. By working toward financing their efforts, as opposed to fundraising for them, they can get much closer to social impact and financial sustainability.

If you want to learn more about applying the concepts of Financing Not Fundraising to your nonprofit, check out our Financing Not Fundraising Webinar Series or download the 27-page Financing Not Fundraising e-book.

See also:

The Nonprofit Business Plan: The Leader’s Guide to Creating a Successful Business Model

The End of Fundraising: Raise More Money by Selling Your Impact

Nonprofit Sustainability: Making Strategic Decisions for Financial Viability

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