Posts Tagged ‘Nine Minutes on Monday’

Get the most from your Mondays

Many leaders are bogged down with managerial tasks that prevent them from pursuing true leadership. Three truths include: 1) Your job is to help your people be as successful as they can in order to produce results. 2) You carry great responsibility as a leader. 3) Leadership takes practice.

Nine needs

If you address the nine needs (four primary and five secondary) of your people, you will increase your leadership potential and the performance of your staff. The primary needs include care, mastery, recognition and purpose. The secondary needs are autonomy, growth, connection, play and model.

Short on time?

James Robbins, author of Nine Minutes on Monday, helps you address all these needs with a question for each. You can ask yourself these questions every Monday morning to set your leadership priorities.

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Join me for a lively discussion about how to transform your leadership with author James Robbins.

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Give your staff a “second paycheck”

So many of us find ourselves explaining to others why we work in the nonprofit sector. There’s a higher purpose that gets us out of bed every morning and keeps us at the desk well after five. So you can imagine my curiosity when I read James Robbins’ chapter on giving your staff a “second paycheck” in his book, Nine Minutes on Monday: The Quick and Easy Way to Go from Manager to Leader.

Robbins’ model “is founded on nine key questions to ask yourself each Monday morning during your leadership planning time. Each question is tied to one of the nine drivers of employee engagement and will help you create small actionable goals that will inspire and motivate your staff.”

In my CausePlanet interview with Robbins, I asked him about “minute four” and the most important minute out of the total nine minutes he recommends each Monday.

CP: In minute four, you talk about giving your staff a “second paycheck” and the positive results of connecting people with purpose. Could you give our readers an example of connecting someone to purpose?

JR: I was recently doing a Nine Minutes workshop for a boutique men’s clothing store. I was asking them to brainstorm for a moment on the question, “Whom do we serve?” When I asked for their answers, one salesman said the word, “clients.” While this is true, there is no compelling purpose here. Then one of the salespeople told a story about how he had recently sold a new suit to a man who had to deliver a eulogy at his father’s funeral. The salesman made a follow-up call to see how the funeral had gone. The man responded by saying it went well and the new suit had made him feel confident and he was grateful for that. This is a great story because it gives the client a face and shows how selling a suit can help someone feel confident at his father’s funeral. There is power in this story but only if the rest of the staff hears this. I encouraged them to pass along stories like these to help employees connect purpose to pay. So stories are one of the most powerful ways to help people connect to purpose. Find great stories about how what you do makes a difference and then find appropriate ways to get them passed on to your staff.

CP: If there could be only one minute on Monday dedicated to this topic, which one would you choose as most important for managers?

JR: That’s a tough question. If I could only pick one, it would be minute nine: the need for a model to follow. Our examples as leaders do more to dictate our success than anything else. If we truly want people to follow us, engage their talents and work with all their heart, then we have to be exemplary leaders. I’m not talking about management ability here either. This goes beyond the role and extends to who you are as a person: how you treat people, how hard you work, whether or not you take responsibility for your mistakes, humility and courage. Like it or not, there is a certain morality attached to leadership and we have to be that part. A leader’s example always has been and always will be paramount when it comes to him/her cultivating a following. The next most important minute is number one: caring for your people.

Consider minute nine, are you creating a model to follow? How do you demonstrate humility, responsibility, a strong work ethic?

CausePlanet members: Don’t forget to register for our next live author interview with Tom Wolff, who trains and consults in collaborative solutions. We’ll discuss the essential principles he explores in his book The Power of Collaborative Solutions: Six Principles and Effective Tools for Building Healthy Communities on Thursday, August 22 at 11 a.m. CST.

See also:

The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology that Fuel Success and Performance at Work

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Does your staff recognition come from the outside or inside?

“Picking up a management book that does not include a chapter on recognition and appreciation is like picking up Mother Teresa’s diary and not finding the word ‘prayer,’” says author James Robbins.

I’m sure there was a time during your childhood when you may have received a piece of candy in recognition for a job well done or reward for good behavior. Once you had eaten the candy, the feeling of accomplishment was quickly forgotten.

In contrast, I’m confident you can remember a time when a parent, coach or teacher told you something positive or specific about how you completed a project, acted like a team player or performed in class. The same holds true for us as adults in the workplace. James Robbins discusses these two types of recognition in his book, and we asked him about it in our interview, highlighting Nine Minutes on Monday: The Quick and Easy Way to Go from Manager to Leader.

Robbins’ model “is founded on nine key questions to ask yourself each Monday morning during your leadership planning time. Each question is tied to one of the nine drivers of employee engagement and will help you create small actionable goals that will inspire and motivate your staff.”

CP: You discuss the difference between recognition and reward and why the latter isn’t as effective. Could you talk a little about the philosophy behind this fact?

JR: There has been some fascinating research in the last few decades about the power of intrinsic motivation versus motivation that is extrinsic or comes from the outside. When people are intrinsically motivated they are more engaged in what they are doing. They will also be more creative and persist longer with a problem. But when rewards are introduced from the outside, especially in the form of cash or prizes, they can almost have a dampening effect on the future motivation with the same task. Not only that, they set up a dangerous cycle of people expecting more of the same. Recognition, on the other hand, is more about helping people feel valued, and one of the best ways to do that is through simple words. In the book I cover an easy formula called The Recognition Codes to help people string together simple recognition statements that can be used with their employees, which literally take a few seconds.

CP: If there could be only one minute on Monday dedicated to this topic, which one would you choose as most important for managers?

JR: That’s a tough question. If I could only pick one, it would be minute nine: the need for a model to follow. Our examples as leaders do more to dictate our success than anything else. If we truly want people to follow us, engage their talents and work with all their heart, then we have to be exemplary leaders. I’m not talking about management ability here either. This goes beyond the role and extends to who you are as a person: how you treat people, how hard you work, whether or not you take responsibility for your mistakes, humility and courage. Like it or not, there is a certain morality attached to leadership and we have to be that part. A leader’s example always has been and always will be paramount when it comes to him/her cultivating a following. The next most important minute is number one: caring for your people.

Are you rewarding your staff with specific comments that demonstrate how much you value them? Furthermore, do you model leadership for your staff? Consider Robbins’ second answer in this interview and how he describes good modeling behavior.

CausePlanet members: Don’t forget to register for our next live author interview with Tom Wolff, who trains and consults in collaborative solutions. We’ll discuss the essential principles he explores in his book The Power of Collaborative Solutions: Six Principles and Effective Tools for Building Healthy Communities on Thursday, August 22 at 11 a.m. CST.

See also:

The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology that Fuel Success and Performance at Work

Leave a reply

Robbins emphasizes awareness and consistency in management

“Great leadership is actually the little things done consistently,” says bestselling author James Robbins in our CausePlanet interview.

I first saw Robbins’ Nine Minutes on Monday when I read the Top 10 business books of the year in The Globe and Mail news. The title of this number-one ranked book resonated with me because we all want to make the most of our time or even kid ourselves that we can beat the clock. Though, I should remind you to consider the source of this blog. Our tagline at CausePlanet is, after all, “where nonprofit leaders get smarter faster.” So when a book title mirrors my obsession with maximizing time, I can’t help but read it.

Author James Robbins delivers on his title promise: Nine Minutes on Monday: The Quick and Easy Way to Go from Manager to Leader. Throughout the course of this book, you will “learn a simple system to help you bring out the best in your employees, enabling them to produce results without adding hours of tasks to your plate.

Robbins’ model “is founded on nine key questions to ask yourself each Monday morning during your leadership planning time. Each question is tied to one of the nine drivers of employee engagement and will help you create small actionable goals that will inspire and motivate your staff.”

I asked Robbins in our CausePlanet interview about the differences readers experience after absorbing his principles as well as what readers will be most surprised to discover:

CausePlanet: Hi, James. I really enjoyed reading your book. I took a lot of notes in the margins and your book is already showing wear and tear after one reading! When someone applies the principles you discuss in your book, how would you describe the macro differences they’ll experience in their own behavior as managers?

Robbins: The biggest change they will notice is an increase in their awareness. I call awareness the quintessential skill of managers. If you have a clear picture of what is going on around you, nine times out of ten you will know what to do. Our problem as managers is that we get so busy with and focused on all the little tasks and details that we forget to lift our heads up and see what’s going on around us. Nine Minutes on Monday helps managers create the habit of awareness.

CausePlanet: What will our readers be most surprised to discover in your Nine-Minute process for Mondays?

Robbins: Readers will be most surprised by the simplicity of the concepts. Often when I speak, someone will tell me she has heard all this before. Knowledge is usually not our problem, but rather it’s a lack of execution regarding the basics that is. Great leadership is actually the little things done consistently. Nine Minutes helps you by creating new habits without adding a lot of extra time and tasks to your already-full plate.

How often are you tending to your leadership responsibilities? How do you maintain consistency?

CausePlanet members: Don’t forget to register for our next live author interview with Tom Wolff, who trains and consults in collaborative solutions. We’ll discuss the essential principles he explores in his book The Power of Collaborative Solutions: Six Principles and Effective Tools for Building Healthy.

See also:

The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology that Fuel Success and Performance at Work

Leave a reply

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