Leave Shakespeare out of your planned giving

“If planned giving is so good for both nonprofit organizations and the donors who support them, why don’t more organizations have a planned giving program?” asks author Michael Rosen in Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing.

This book addresses all the myths about planned giving that might be holding you or your organization back from tremendous opportunities. This comprehensive look at planned giving provides useful information that will help charities get started or established nonprofits refresh their approaches to achieve greater results.

 

Michael Rosen’s Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing looks in detail at how to promote planned gifts on behalf of your organization. While many Americans have the ability to make a planned gift, the research reveals that few have actually done so and that many more are willing to consider this type of giving. Rosen explains this condition means two things:

“First, there is a significant gap in what traditional planned-gift marketing is achieving and what people are willing to consider. Second, traditional planned-gift marketing is just scratching the surface of planned giving potential.”

I asked Heidi Hancock, a partner at Mosaic Non-Profit Development, who oversees strategy and operations for the Boston-based consultancy to join us for a guest interview about Rosen’s book.

CausePlanet: Do you agree with Rosen’s five myths about planned giving and would you add any to them based on your experience in the field with clients?

Hancock: Absolutely, those five myths are pervasive when it comes to planned giving. I find Myth One (planned giving is very difficult) and Myth Two (one needs to be a planned giving expert to be involved in gift planning) are enough to stop 90 percent of causes from pursuing planned gifts. I would add, “I can’t talk to my donors about making a planned gift because it means my cause is looking forward to their demise” to the planned giving myth roster.

Planned giving offers such creative ways for a donor and a cause to work together to achieve a donor’s personal goals alongside an organization’s goals. These goals are often reached during the donor’s lifetime. Not all planned gifts come about like a Shakespearean tragedy where everyone dies. Some of my favorite planned giving stories demonstrate tremendous impact; benefit the donor, his/her family and the cause; and nobody dies to make it happen!

Join us for our next installment with Heidi Hancock about Donor-Centered Planned Gift Marketing. We’ll feature her answer to what readers will be most surprised to learn in Rosen’s book.

Are you guilty of believing one of the myths discussed in this post? If not, what else is stopping you from inviting your donors to consider a planned gift?

CausePlanet members: Register now for our next author interview with branding expert and author, Jocelyne Daw, on Wednesday, July 31 at 11 a.m. CST. We’ll discuss her book Cause Marketing: Partner for Purpose, Passion & Profits.

Not a member yet? Get smarter faster and learn more about access to our summary library and author interviews or try us out and download a free sample or purchase single titles that interest you at our store.

By Denise McMahan

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One response to “Leave Shakespeare out of your planned giving”

  1. Great image for this article! 😉
    I really enjoyed Rosen’s book and the very direct and clear suggestions he made for implementation. It’s a great resource to keep handy no matter what kind of development program you are advancing.

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